Archive for category article/interview/review

Magnus Magazine

This is just to mention that I’m included in the online UK web magazine Magnus:

http://magnusmag.com/WilliamTAyton/

There is a small gallery of images & a Q&A interview/artist statement. The magazine is definitely worth a look.

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My Artist’s Statement

From time to time, I’m asked or required to write some kind of artist’s statement. Today, this came up again when an online magazine (webzine, I guess) asked me to do this for a small article they were putting together. Here it is:

William T. Ayton’s work deals with myth, social issues, imagination and the human condition. Art is a means of reaching out to other souls in the hope of finding some kind of connection. There isn’t much else to say.

It always seems to me that art is either too complex to be reduced to a short paragraph, or it should be self-evident. However, I thought the above wasn’t bad. The artist’s statements I prefer to read tend to deviate from the norm (whatever that is) anyway. Not that I spend a lot of time reading artist’s statements…

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Art tip: Sleep on it

[Note: I’m just putting up some random tips & ideas that I’ve had from time to time. Maybe some day I will collect, edit & collate them, & put them in a little book or something.]

I’ve often found that I finish a piece of artwork (or think I’ve finished it) & am not sure if it’s actually done, or even any good. This is partly because I’ve been so focused on the piece for a length of time that I’ve lost all sense of it except in relation to itself…

In this case, the best thing to do is to put it aside for as long as possible. Looking at it again in the cold light of day may be refreshing enough for you to come to the conclusion that, hey, it’s not bad, or it’s really good, or it’s actually not that good at all.

Best of all may be to put the piece out of sight for weeks, months or even years. You may get a pleasant surprise. Or not. You may also find that you are far enough away from the original impulse to easily finish the piece if you finally decide it’s not finished.

Ultimately: some artworks need to be destroyed.

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